Diplomate Designation

AAIM's Diplomate Designation is a prestigious credential that all integrative medicine professionals should strive to attain. It is based on measurable skills, knowledge, experience, education, and training. When you become a Diplomate of the American Association of Integrative Medicine, you are able to choose which one of our specialized Colleges you would like to become a Diplomate of. Please see below for a listing of our Colleges.


Diplomate Requirements:

  • A current license to practice in your state or current certification in your specialty (if applicable)
  • At least three (3) years of experience in the field of integrative healthcare
  • Attain a minimum of 200 points on the application based on education, experience, knowledge, skill, and training

  • Note: For applicants whose specialty is not listed below, the designation will be Diplomate of the American Association of Integrative Medicine.


    AAIM Colleges

    College of Conventional Medicine

    Developed by breakthroughs in science and technology, conventional medicine originated from Egyptian and Greek medicine. It has become the mainstream medical care practiced in the United States and most other countries around the world. In the United States, it consists of allopathic medicine and osteopathic medicine.


    College of Biologically Based Practices

    Biologically based practices in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use substances found in nature, such as herbs, foods, and vitamins. Some examples include dietary supplements, herbal products, and the use of other so-called natural but as yet scientifically unproven therapies (for example, using shark cartilage to treat cancer).


    College of Energy Medicine

    Energy therapies involve the use of energy fields. There are two types: Biofield therapies and Bioelectromagnetic-based therapies.

    Biofield therapies are intended to affect energy fields that purportedly surround and penetrate the human body. The existence of such fields has not yet been scientifically proven. Some forms of energy therapy manipulate biofields by applying pressure and/or manipulating the body by placing the hands in, or through, these fields. One examples is Qi Gong, a component of traditional Chinese medicine that combines movement, meditation, and controlled breathing. The intent is to improve blood flow and the flow of Qi. Another example is Reiki, a therapy in which practitioners seek to transmit a universal energy to a person, either from distance or by placing their hands on or near that person. The intent is to heal the spirit and thus the body. Therapeutic touch is a therapy in which practitioners pass their hands over another person's body with the intent to use their own perceived healing energy to identify energy imbalances and promote health.

    Bioelectromagnetic-based therapies involve the unconventional use of electromagnetic fields, such as pulsed fields, magnetic fields, or alternating current or direct current fields.


    College of Integrative Pediatrics (DIP)

    Integrative pediatrics is an approach that puts the care of the patient and patient’s family at the center of treatment, allowing the family to dictate treatment choices under the guidance of a skilled clinician. Integrative pediatrics to addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and environmental influences that affect a child’s health. It employees a strategy that considers the child’s unique conditions, needs and circumstances. It uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and to help the child regain and maintain optimum health.

    The defining principles of integrative medicine are:

    • The child, caregivers/family and practitioner are partners in the healing process.
    • All factors that influence health, wellness, and disease are taken into consideration.
    • The care addresses the whole child, including body, mind, and spirit in the context of community.
    • Practitioners use all appropriate healing sciences to facilitate the body’s innate healing response.
    • The integrative pediatrician favors effective interventions that are natural and less invasive whenever possible.

    The Integrative pediatrician focuses on areas common in acute and chronic health issues and treatments for children. They use a variety of alternative medical techniques, including Biomedical, nutrition, herbal medicine, mind-body approaches, homeopathy, manipulative medicine, energy medicine, Ayurvedic, & Traditional Chinese medicine as they apply to pediatrics. The practioner understands the mind and its relationship to health in positive and negative ways and how to influence that relationship in children. They assess diet and herbal remedies, as well as the legal, ethical, and medical issues that caregivers should consider when planning a pediatric patient's course of treatment.


    College of Manipulative and Body-Based Practices

    Manipulative and body-based practices in CAM are based on manipulation, the application of controlled force to a joint, moving it beyond the normal range of motion in an effort to aid in restoring health. Manipulation may be performed as a part of other therapies or, as whole medical systems, including chiropractic medicine, massage, naturopathy, and/or movement of one or more parts of the body. One example is chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, a type of manipulation practiced by osteopathic physicians. It is combined with physical therapy and instruction in proper posture, and massage: pressing, rubbing, and moving muscles and other soft tissues of the body, primarily by using the hands and fingers. The aim is to increase the flow of blood and oxygen to the massaged area.


    College of Mind-Body Medicine

    Mind-body medicine uses a variety of techniques designed to enhance the mind's capacity to affect bodily functions and symptoms. Some techniques that were considered CAM in the past have become mainstream (for example, patient support groups and cognitive-behavioral therapy). Other mind-body techniques are still considered CAM, including meditation, a conscious mental process using certain techniques—such as focusing attention or maintaining a specific posture—to suspend the stream of thoughts and relax the body and mind. Also included are prayer, mental healing, and therapies that use creative outlets such as art, music, or dance.


    College of Whole Medical Systems

    Whole medical systems are built upon complete systems of theory and practice. Often, these systems have evolved apart from and earlier than the conventional medical approach used in the United States. Examples of whole medical systems that have developed in Western cultures include homeopathic medicine, and naturopathic medicine, whole medical systems that originated in Europe. Homeopathy seeks to stimulate the body's ability to heal itself by giving very small doses of highly diluted substances that in larger doses would produce illness or symptoms (an approach called "like cures like"), while naturopathy aims to support the body's ability to heal itself through the use of dietary and lifestyle changes together with CAM therapies such as herbs, massage, and joint manipulation. Examples of systems that have developed in non-Western cultures include traditional Chinese medicine, a whole medical system that originated in China. It is based on the concept that disease results from disruption in the flow of Qi and imbalance in the forces of yin and yang. Practices such as herbs, meditation, massage, and acupuncture seek to aid healing by restoring the yin-yang balance and the flow of Qi, and Ayurveda, a whole medical system that originated in India. It aims to integrate the body, mind, and spirit to prevent and treat disease. Therapies used include herbs, massage, and yoga.


    College of Clinical Nutrition

    The doctor who is a Diplomate in Clinical Nutrition possesses the knowledge and skills necessary to practice clinical nutrition.

    The Diplomate of the College of Clinical Nutrition is a portal of entry, primary health care, practitioner who has received additional education and training in nutritional assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and case management for the promotion of individual and public health and well‐being.

    The responsibilities of a Diplomate of the College of Clinical Nutrition may include, but are not limited to:

    • Obtaining a relevant case history and review of systems.
    • Performing appropriate physical and nutritional evaluations.
    • Ordering, performing, and/or reviewing diagnostic imaging and interpreting results.
    • Ordering, performing, and/or reviewing clinical laboratory tests and special studies and interpreting results.
    • Correlating clinical findings to arrive at a clinical impression and/or diagnosis.
    • Applying therapeutic nutritional recommendations including but not limited to: diets and dietary interventions, micro and/or macro levels of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, enzymes, amino acids, fatty acids, herbs, glandulars, natural hormones, homeopathic remedies, phytochemicals, nutraceuticals, and medical foods.
    • Maintaining appropriate documentation for the practice of clinical nutrition.
    • Promoting healthy lifestyles, public health and wellness, and the prevention of disease.
    • Referral to and/or co-managing with another physician when prudent or appropriate.
    • Managing patient care safely and effectively.


    College of Integrative Pediatrics (DIP)
     

    Integrative pediatrics is an approach that puts the care of the patient and patient’s family at the center of treatment, allowing the family to dictate treatment choices under the guidance of a skilled clinician. Integrative pediatrics to addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and environmental influences that affect a child’s health. It employees a strategy that considers the child’s unique conditions, needs and circumstances. It uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and to help the child regain and maintain optimum health.

    The defining principles of integrative pediatrics are:

    • The child, caregivers/family and practitioner are partners in the healing process.
    • All factors that influence health, wellness, and disease are taken into consideration.
    • The care addresses the whole child, including body, mind, and spirit in the context of community.
    • Practitioners use all appropriate healing sciences to facilitate the body’s innate healing response.

    The Integrative pediatrician focuses on areas common in acute and chronic health issues and treatments for children. They use a variety of alternative medical techniques, including Biomedical, nutrition, herbal medicine, mind-body approaches, homeopathy, manipulative medicine, energy medicine, Ayurvedic, & Traditional Chinese medicine as they apply to pediatrics. The practioner understands the mind and its relationship to health in positive and negative ways and how to influence that relationship in children. They assess diet and herbal remedies, as well as the legal, ethical, and medical issues that caregivers should consider when planning a pediatric patient's course of treatment.


    Previous AAIM Colleges of Membership

    AAIM does recognize previously offered Colleges of Membership, which includes the following:

    College of Acupuncture & Neuromuscular Therapy
    College of Advocacy & Education
    College of Behavioral Health
    College of Chiropractic
    College of Dentistry
    College of Eastern Medicine
    College of Natural Therapies
    College of Nursing
    College of Pain Management
    College of Pastoral Counseling
    College of Pharmaceutical & Apothecary Sciences
    College of Phytotherapy
    College of Physicians
    College of Physician Assistants
    College of Veterinary Medicine

    Although no longer available, Diplomate status earned under these Colleges will remain valid as long as annual renewal requirements are met and Oath of Membership is upheld.

    Applying for Diplomate status with the American Association of Integrative Medicine is easy. Simply complete a short application online and submit copies of your résumé and supporting materials via fax (417)823-9959 or mail.

    AAIM CAO
    2750 E. Sunshine Street
    Springfield, MO 65804

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